ASEAN Expat Jobs and the planned integration into the ASEAN Economic Community (AEC). This is supposed to happen in 2015. But may still have a long way to go according to some observers at the recent Leadership Forum in Myanmar. “The ten-member nation integration is moving in the right direction. It is probably not moving as fast as many people would like. And there are various reasons for that. But it is also continuously moving in the right direction” said one Singaporean-based CEO. See expat job information list of the ten ASEAN member countries to the right. We have another 12-15 countries listed under Asian countries, please visit there for getting information about all the other Asian nations not part of the South-East Asian countries.

ASEAN Jobs and Business Outlook Survey

AMCHAM Business Oulook Survey Asia ASEAN l Jobandwork.asiaASEAN Business Outlook Survey. American Chambers of Commerce, AMCHAM, has conducted a study among members. The purpose was to understand outlook on business growth. And other ways of local factors in the region. Companies view ASEAN economic integration as very important. Yet they are skeptical that ASEAN will achieve its Economic Community (AEC) goals by 2015. Importance of Integration. ASEAN economic integration is valuable to majority of respondents, with most reporting that this integration is important to helping their companies do business in the region. Of all the countries surveyed, executives in Vietnam had the highest positive response rate. Read or Download the report clicking on the link.

ASEAN expat jobs seekers and local entrepreneurs

asean-expat-jobs-seekers-and-local-entrepreneursThe 2015 deadline of having ASEAN economically integrated is drawing close (“already passed”. Editor). ASEAN expat jobs seekers and local entrepreneurs need to take the lead, according to another high-profile director. “We should not point fingers at the governments. They are too busy with politics in other parts of the ten member countries. And is a really good example of bringing entrepreneurs together to think about what we can really do,” he said. Multinational-experienced managers in developing countries was almost nonexistent a few decades ago. And of the few who did exist, it was impossible to monitor their work because of the rudimentary communications technology that was available at the time. Of course, all this has changed dramatically in the past 40 years of so. Most progressive emerging countries have been able to develop a generation of local managers and many are capable of working at the most demanding international standards.

By Pranee Thongsuk